Posts in Shows
Lorenzo Bueno "Pointless" Opening

Sunday, March 25th, 2018 from 6 – 9 pm

Dear Boston Properties,

I have long been fascinated with 601 Lexington Ave, a building your company acquired in 2001. I can’t believe the whole building is lifted and supported by those columns! The 45 degree angle crown also really distinguishes it on the skyline. It’s a very impressive purchase, you must be very proud…

Since September I’ve been working on a proposal for an addition to your building. A folly of sorts. Have you ever looked up folly in the dictionary? It is most commonly used as a synonym for foolishness or lack of wisdom, but it has multiple definitions, two of which I find particularly interesting. In theater, folly is a common allegorical figure often portrayed as a jester. Folly is used for insight and advice on the part of the monarch, taking advantage of his license to mock and speak freely to dispense frank observations and highlight the foolishness of their ruler. In architecture, a folly is a costly ornamental building with no practical function, originally made to decorate French and English gardens in the eighteenth century, they were emblems of recreation and foolish luxury….

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"Monotypes with Friends" Opening

Saturday, February 10th, 2018 from 6 – 9 pm

Entrance presents a group of monotypes from fifteen artists. All works were produced over a period of two months on an etching press in the studio behind the gallery, with the show’s curator Jack Shannon. The printing became a stage for mutual learning between printer and artist, and by proxy, artist to artist.

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Dylan Kraus "Night Light" Opening

Abandoning more conceptual imagery in favor of simplicity, Night Light serves as a refinement to Dylan Kraus’ exploration of time and symmetry. These eight new paintings encapsulate dreamscapes and night visions, where a microcosm of birds and berries expands into images of the cosmos and the aurora borealis. Though intimate in scale, Kraus’ paintings draw inspiration from the infinite complexity of nature; a language of different shapes, sounds and forms that in turn create a spiritual atmosphere. Similar to a fable or fairytale, Kraus’ work aims to develop an emotional relation to the viewer through its hidden symbols and narratives. While his last series of clock paintings seem vastly different in terms of subject matter, Kraus views his practice as an ongoing study on themes of symmetry, the organic, the systematic, dreamtime and states of perception. The series was made on a porch in open air, and the show is aptly accompanied by field recordings of a summer night.

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Claire Christerson "Daisy Chains Heart Ecology"

When I need solitude, I envision myself in a purple forest that is filled with fairies and monsters, this is a small chapter from a bigger world within me.

The world of Claire Christerson is infinite, deeply spiritual, and filled with double meaning. An intense sketcher and writer, Christerson explains, “I am interested in the personal saga, the myth, creating a story without words, letting my drawings and sculptures fill in the verbal gaps...” Personal experiences manifest themselves into motifs, characters, and colors that repeat throughout her practice, from film and sculpture to painting and watercolor. Alive, these motifs develop their own iconography through repetition. Ultimately, Christerson creates a universe that is unique, with its own language, images, and symbols.

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Elizabeth Englander "Headless"

Overflow, oxidation, and imperfection transform Entrance’s outdoor vestibule into a grotto, where the artist presents a fountain en plein air. In Ass-backward, Englander mounts a torso atop an Ionic column, utilizing the form of a Renaissance “term” figure, a grotesque interpretation of the human form derived from Greco-Roman models. Working with nontraditional materials (steel wool, discarded plastic bins), Englander draws on the degradational method that Calvinist builders used in the overly ornate architecture commissioned by their aristocratic Catholic patrons in the 1500’s. In such structures, subversion is generated by what scholar Catharine Randall calls “the friction between [...] two apparently twinned but in fact warring systems of signification,” 2 —that is, the normative aesthetics of the dominant group versus the radical, reforming vision of their builders, secretly encoded in complex iconography and faulty construction.

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