Lorenzo Bueno "Pointless" in Ravelin

Lorenzo Bueno’s first solo show in NYC, “Pointless,” is an architectural proposal to Boston Properties, the property owners and managers of the former Citicorp Center. The project calls for Boston Properties to construct a scale replica of the building and install it upended on the original structure. The matching angled roofs are to cleat onto each other and suspend the copy atop the original.

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Lorenzo Bueno "Pointless" Opening

Sunday, March 25th, 2018 from 6 – 9 pm

Dear Boston Properties,

I have long been fascinated with 601 Lexington Ave, a building your company acquired in 2001. I can’t believe the whole building is lifted and supported by those columns! The 45 degree angle crown also really distinguishes it on the skyline. It’s a very impressive purchase, you must be very proud…

Since September I’ve been working on a proposal for an addition to your building. A folly of sorts. Have you ever looked up folly in the dictionary? It is most commonly used as a synonym for foolishness or lack of wisdom, but it has multiple definitions, two of which I find particularly interesting. In theater, folly is a common allegorical figure often portrayed as a jester. Folly is used for insight and advice on the part of the monarch, taking advantage of his license to mock and speak freely to dispense frank observations and highlight the foolishness of their ruler. In architecture, a folly is a costly ornamental building with no practical function, originally made to decorate French and English gardens in the eighteenth century, they were emblems of recreation and foolish luxury….

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"Monotypes with Friends" Opening

Saturday, February 10th, 2018 from 6 – 9 pm

Entrance presents a group of monotypes from fifteen artists. All works were produced over a period of two months on an etching press in the studio behind the gallery, with the show’s curator Jack Shannon. The printing became a stage for mutual learning between printer and artist, and by proxy, artist to artist.

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Dylan Kraus in Ravelin Magazine

Dylan Kraus is an artist who I can always have a passionate and genuine discussion with about nature. He is someone who I’ll walk away from thinking, “Wow, I love art so much.” Kraus’ passion for art is contagious and it is evident in his latest body of work, entitled: Night Light, a show of small paintings, depicting scenes from nature. He is able to translate the complex, yet simple feelings that come with surrounding oneself in nature; and in doing so, finds the quiet within.

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Dylan Kraus "Night Light" Opening

Abandoning more conceptual imagery in favor of simplicity, Night Light serves as a refinement to Dylan Kraus’ exploration of time and symmetry. These eight new paintings encapsulate dreamscapes and night visions, where a microcosm of birds and berries expands into images of the cosmos and the aurora borealis. Though intimate in scale, Kraus’ paintings draw inspiration from the infinite complexity of nature; a language of different shapes, sounds and forms that in turn create a spiritual atmosphere. Similar to a fable or fairytale, Kraus’ work aims to develop an emotional relation to the viewer through its hidden symbols and narratives. While his last series of clock paintings seem vastly different in terms of subject matter, Kraus views his practice as an ongoing study on themes of symmetry, the organic, the systematic, dreamtime and states of perception. The series was made on a porch in open air, and the show is aptly accompanied by field recordings of a summer night.

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Dylan Kraus in Vice

Opening Saturday night at Entrance in the Lower East Side is Night Light, a show of paintings by the New York-based multi-hyphenate artist Dylan Kraus. New York by way of Ohio, Kraus is an outlier of the highest order: a psychedelic shaman with a stick 'n' poke flash sheet; a Rorschach inkblot that looks like Alfred E. Newman; Fragonard on extra-strength Blue Dream. Sure, it’s a downtown art opening on a weekend, so you can fully expect “emperor’s new clothiers” to be out in droves—but you’re not going to an art show for the people... are you? Either way, you’re likely to meet a lot of characters in New York, but you're not gonna meet anyone who doesn't believe in Dylan. 

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Claire Christerson "Daisy Chains Heart Ecology"

When I need solitude, I envision myself in a purple forest that is filled with fairies and monsters, this is a small chapter from a bigger world within me.

The world of Claire Christerson is infinite, deeply spiritual, and filled with double meaning. An intense sketcher and writer, Christerson explains, “I am interested in the personal saga, the myth, creating a story without words, letting my drawings and sculptures fill in the verbal gaps...” Personal experiences manifest themselves into motifs, characters, and colors that repeat throughout her practice, from film and sculpture to painting and watercolor. Alive, these motifs develop their own iconography through repetition. Ultimately, Christerson creates a universe that is unique, with its own language, images, and symbols.

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Claire Christerson in Artspace

If you're feeling like a freak in need of some tripped out camaraderie, look no further than the self-woven universe of New York-based multi-media artist Claire Christerson. Evocative of early film pioneer Georges Méliès, her surrealist, vaudevillian tableaus are charming and wonderfully imaginative. Shoddy after-effects animation turns Christerson's models into doll-like mannequins, D.I.Y. props and backdrops shimmer with glitter, face paint is liberally applied and voices are pitched to helium-inhaled highs. The resulting effect is that weird, cool, punk-ish attitude reminiscent of Ryan Trecartin but much sweeter and less net-arty. Christerson's work has been featured on Dazed Digital, I-D Magazine, Purple, Artnet and Vice. She has also shown at Miami Art Basel, New Museum and Image Gallery. Her upcoming show titled "Daisy Chain Heart Ecology" opens at the new Entrance (48 Ludlow Street) on September 9th. According to the press release, the show is set to be the artists "most comprehensive and personal exhibition to date."

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Elizabeth Englander "Headless"

Overflow, oxidation, and imperfection transform Entrance’s outdoor vestibule into a grotto, where the artist presents a fountain en plein air. In Ass-backward, Englander mounts a torso atop an Ionic column, utilizing the form of a Renaissance “term” figure, a grotesque interpretation of the human form derived from Greco-Roman models. Working with nontraditional materials (steel wool, discarded plastic bins), Englander draws on the degradational method that Calvinist builders used in the overly ornate architecture commissioned by their aristocratic Catholic patrons in the 1500’s. In such structures, subversion is generated by what scholar Catharine Randall calls “the friction between [...] two apparently twinned but in fact warring systems of signification,” 2 —that is, the normative aesthetics of the dominant group versus the radical, reforming vision of their builders, secretly encoded in complex iconography and faulty construction.

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Ahmet Civelek "Number 2: Cycles"

In Ahmet Civelek’s practice, destruction is seen as a form of authorship more widespread and accessible than creation. To destroy is to leave one’s own mark on the objects, and to acknowledge that they too can leave a mark on both the artist and viewer.

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